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Comparison of the human eye and the camera

Camera and the eye has much in common than just the idea of conceptual philosophy.
The camera lens may mimic the human eye, but they are not identical. In some cases, the eye has the advantage; but sometimes the camera sees things the human eye cannot.

The camera functions similarly to the human eye. The pupil, allowing light to enter, and the film or photographic paper plays the role of the retina, the tissue of the inner eye upon which the image is projected.
The image lands on a sheet of specialized brain cells (neurons) that are excited by light, just like film in the back of the camera
Camera is like a robotic eye.

Cornea is the cap of the eye: is transparent and is located at the front of the eye. It has a structure of spherical curvature. The camera lens is transparent and made of glass, and its structure as the cornea maintains a spherical curvature. This structure expands the spatial and visual capacity increases the visual fields. Another view was limited to a narrow picture with many details in the space.
Anyway ones eye visual field is limited while the camera's lens can overcome the eye and increase the field of view significantly.

Light passes through the cornea and lens; in a camera, the light enters and passes through a lens. Also, the pupil of the human eye adjusts depending on the surrounding light; like the human eye's pupil, the camera has an aperture that performs the same function.

Many cameras can use a variety of different lenses, from wide-angle to telephoto lengths. The human eye is essentially a very wide-angle lens---roughly the equivalent of a 22mm lens.
The eye and the camera capabilities with the curvature of the cornea and lens - to focus near or far.

Opening the shutter of the camera determines how much light enters the camera and sensor or film is returned.
With the human eye, iris opening determines how much light reaches the retina in the eye: When the iris contracts - the pupil gets smaller, and less light enters the eye: for example in conditions of bright sunlight.
When the pupil expands, as in darkness, more light can penetrate the eye.
The retina sits at the back of the eye and collects the light reflected from the surrounding environment to form the image. The same task in the camera is performed either by film or sensors in digital cameras.

The image an eye perceives is projected from the cornea to the retina, which absorbs the image and projects it to the brain. A camera projects an image on to film where it is captured and saved as a black and white image. The retina contains millions of cones that provide the image with color.
Stereoscopic view :The biggest difference between eyes and a camera lens is that two eyes give us stereoscopic vision. This allows our eyes to project a more detailed image to the brain than a single camera lens and provide depth of field, something a single camera lens can't do.
Comparison of the human eye and the camera

Camera and the eye has much in common than just the idea of conceptual philosophy.
The camera lens may mimic the human eye, but they are not identical. In some cases, the eye has the advantage; but sometimes the camera sees things the human eye cannot.

The camera functions similarly to the human eye. The pupil, allowing light to enter, and the film or photographic paper plays the role of the retina, the tissue of the inner eye upon which the image is projected.
The image lands on a sheet of specialized brain cells (neurons) that are excited by light, just like film in the back of the camera
Camera is like a robotic eye.

Cornea is the cap of the eye: is transparent and is located at the front of the eye. It has a structure of spherical curvature. The camera lens is transparent and made of glass, and its structure as the cornea maintains a spherical curvature. This structure expands the spatial and visual capacity increases the visual fields. Another view was limited to a narrow picture with many details in the space.
Anyway ones eye visual field is limited while the camera's lens can overcome the eye and increase the field of view significantly.

Light passes through the cornea and lens; in a camera, the light enters and passes through a lens. Also, the pupil of the human eye adjusts depending on the surrounding light; like the human eye's pupil, the camera has an aperture that performs the same function.

Many cameras can use a variety of different lenses, from wide-angle to telephoto lengths. The human eye is essentially a very wide-angle lens---roughly the equivalent of a 22mm lens.
The eye and the camera capabilities with the curvature of the cornea and lens - to focus near or far.

Opening the shutter of the camera determines how much light enters the camera and sensor or film is returned.
With the human eye, iris opening determines how much light reaches the retina in the eye: When the iris contracts - the pupil gets smaller, and less light enters the eye: for example in conditions of bright sunlight.
When the pupil expands, as in darkness, more light can penetrate the eye.
The retina sits at the back of the eye and collects the light reflected from the surrounding environment to form the image. The same task in the camera is performed either by film or sensors in digital cameras.

The image an eye perceives is projected from the cornea to the retina, which absorbs the image and projects it to the brain. A camera projects an image on to film where it is captured and saved as a black and white image. The retina contains millions of cones that provide the image with color.
Stereoscopic view :The biggest difference between eyes and a camera lens is that two eyes give us stereoscopic vision. This allows our eyes to project a more detailed image to the brain than a single camera lens and provide depth of field, something a single camera lens can't do.

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